Hume: The Essential Philosophical Works | Part I - Prologue

Over the course of my lifetime I have garnered quite a collection of literature spanning the tedious to the abstract. From discussions on what is existence to specific supreme court cases. I'd say I own roughly 1,000 books with ~900 being PDF's (totaling 7.68 GB of disk space) and another ~100 physically.

Recently, I purchased 19 new books from Amazon using a $200 giftcard I had received from a wealthy friend of my parents (who knew I would likely spend the money on something academic). The biggest book of the bunch was Hume: The Essential Philosophical Works.

My friend, John, has spoke highly of David Hume multiple times so I figured I would finally dive deep into some of his work first given this opportunity. Now, I am familiar with the general themes of his work as I have taken philosophy courses where some of his arguments have been presented and have watched videos on YouTube briefly explaining famous philosophers. If you have ~15 minutes I'd recommend watching School of Life's 11 minute YouTube video on Hume and reading some of the insightful comments. For simplicity's sake I have embed the video below.

This book contains 5 pieces of Hume's work: A Treatise of Human Nature, An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding, An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals, A Dialogue, and My Own Life. In total the book is ~900 pages split into many 3 to 5 page "essays." I say essays because I do not know if that is the correct term for his pieces, but you all understand what I mean. I will make a post dedicated to summarizing each essay and my reflections upon them. Note: these summaries are for the philosophical portions alone.

To conclude, I want to note that the author put an advertisement on pg. 571 stating that Hume and his contemporaries largely consider his two enquiries to be the standard of his philosophy and that his treatise was juvenile and premature.

P.S. - If you wish to read David Hume for yourself https://davidhume.org/ has published 15 texts of his online for free.

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